Answers to the Gothenburg Questions – Now Available online!!

The ACCENTs Second Policy-Driven Synthesis, “Answers to the Gothenburg Questions”, edited by Jens Hjorth and Frank Raes, is now available online.

This report, written by scientists for the policy maker, is presented as answers by the atmospheric chemistry and air pollution research community to questions defined though a participatory process involving policy makers and scientists, in view of the revision of the Gothenburg Protocol.

Download the Report here.

Definition of the questions
The process started at the meeting “Air pollution and its relationship to climate change and sustainable development ” organized by ASTA, NORDEN and ACCENT (Gothenburg, 12-14 March, 2007, http://asta.ivi.se/Workshops/). This meeting initially produced 19 questions. They were subsequently prioritized through the involvement of 9 policy makers and 14 scientists. The policy makers indicated what questions are most relevant in the light of the revision of the Gothenburg Protocol. The scientists indicated for which of those questions there was enough information to give an answer during the course of 2008. The 19 questions were reduced to 10 (see Appendix). A discussion within the ACCENT management committee and further editing resulted in their final form.
The answers to these so called “Gothenburg questions” were prepared based on ACCENTs scientific synthesis and integration of the present state of atmospheric chemistry research. This synthesis and integration was performed during 2008 and 2009. For some questions, out of the scope of ACCENT, other experts were called to contribute. Finally, each answer was reviewed by one or more scientists.

Issues covered
Significant two-way interactions between climate change and air pollution are illustrated. They call for an integrated climate change and air pollution policy. The data needed to develop such an integrated policy are reviewed. Synergies and trade-offs between greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission control measures are listed. In particular, the benefits of the EU Climate & Energy package for air pollution are quantified. There is a further focus on emission control measures for particulate matter from diesel engines, and on the emissions from marine and air transport. With discussions about the effects of tropospheric ozone on carbon uptake in the biosphere, and about the effect of air pollution by reactive nitrogen on biodiversity, significant interactions between air pollution and the biosphere are illustrated. Some of the data required to study these interactions are reviewed.

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